I Can Hear the Cuckoo: Life in the Wilds of Wales

£8.495
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I Can Hear the Cuckoo: Life in the Wilds of Wales

I Can Hear the Cuckoo: Life in the Wilds of Wales

RRP: £16.99
Price: £8.495
£8.495 FREE Shipping

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Description

I often forget to read the NetGalley books I have downloaded if I have a lot of library books out but I did fill out a recent survey and it asked a lot of questions about its Shelf app. I requested this book from NetGalley after seeing it on Paul Halfman Halfbook’s blog post about upcoming books – one of his other commenters mentioned they were going to look them up on NG and I followed suit and ended up with a couple.

The author’s descriptions of grief were quite well written but for the other aspects of her life that the book covers I wanted to tell her to just get a grip. It's difficult to tell at first whether Kiran is living in Wales properly as she initially mentions spending only weekends there. and there were a lot of short chapters which meant there might be a blank left-hand page, getting you flustered.So much felt familiar yet also felt strange, a testament to how vast this beautiful countryside is and how well written this book is. But she quickly discovers a sense of belonging in the small, close-knit community she finds there; her neighbour Sarah, who teaches her how to sledge when the winter snow arrives; Jane, a 70-year-old woman who lives at the top of a mountain with three dogs and four alpacas with an inspiring attitude for life; and Wilf, the farmer who eats the same supper every day, and taught Kiran that the cuckoo arrives in April and leaves in July.

They’re helped to settle in by the people from the B’n’B they stay in on their first visit, people with their own family troubles, and they get to know other residents and incomers, including the farmer, Wilf, with whom Sidhu has profound conversations that often make them both weep.It's a book about moving through grief and the people we find in the midst of our sadness - and what this small community in the Welsh countryside can teach us about life. Here, in I Can Hear the Cuckoo: Life in the Wilds of Wales, Kiran is doubly challenged to tell her painful tale of her mother’s loss during Christmas Eve and her subsequent burial on New Year’s Eve, which she can never enjoy as others; indeed, she has never enjoyed this festive season due to her father’s alcoholism during her childhood days and her mother’s demise in adulthood. We don’t share your credit card details with third-party sellers, and we don’t sell your information to others. But as the months wear on, Kiran starts to connect with the close-knit community she finds there; her neighbour Sarah, who shows her how to sledge when the winter snow arrives; Jane, a 70-year-old woman who lives at the top of a mountain with three dogs and four alpacas; and Wilf, the farmer who eats the same supper every day, and teaches Kiran that the cuckoo arrives in April and leaves in July. I was expecting this book would be more about the author learning to deal with her grief over the death of her mother, and whilst she of course does touch on that, the book is really about a fish out of water learning basic countryside facts, which I didn’t find particularly interesting.

Reading this book on my tablet through the NetGalley shelf app was a slightly tricky job, as it came out in double-spread pages in an odd font, with the next page accessed by swiping downwards, so you had to go left – right – down diagonally to the left – right, etc. What I enjoyed was the style of writing and the discoveries she made while she was living this more rural, isolated life.

This amount includes seller specified domestic postage charges as well as applicable international postage, dispatch, and other fees. Time is the Houdini of the metaphysical world; it escapes through the back door of our lives, although we never really felt it enter.

She's always lived in the city, so to swap city life for rural Wales was a big step but she knew she needed something new, and after a holiday with her husband they took the plunge to move and see what life could offer them there. So although this was more of a bereavement memoir than I expected and might be difficult to read if you’re losing someone (or comforting, as she finds her way through) there was a lot of value in it for me. The book is a tapestry of two different worlds intertwined, capturing the extremities of life itself. Well, I see this will be available in paperback in September this year, so I’m encouraged – though it may already be in our library.The best parts of the book, for me, was the description of the individuals and community in a very small hamlet and the impact of the seasons.



  • Fruugo ID: 258392218-563234582
  • EAN: 764486781913
  • Sold by: Fruugo

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